Bought a new router (Netgear R6700) and my internet speed has increased 10 fold, and I can catch my WiFi from the apartment gym, eliminating the need to tinker with tethering. Oh, and Spotify and Overcast AirPlay work now. Should have done this months ago.

Just gave a Bird and Lime a go from our AirBNB just over a mile away. Now I want a scooter fleet in Baltimore.

I hope there is a way to share your Siri Shortcut workflows. More to come at the WWDC State of the Union.

BWI✈️SJC

Another year, another dub dub. Looking forward to seeing everyone there!

Super hyped to try 11.4 and AirPlay 2 on HomePod. I hope that fixes my streaming woes from Spotify at my place.

Obscura 2

I remember when Ben first showed me the Control Wheel at Stumptown during my December trip to NYC, just days before he moved back to Dublin. He demonstrated it with pride, even when it was a proof of concept without the rich functionality and haptic feedback it has today. It was clear he was on to something.

I’ve been on the beta for quite some time, but I didn’t truly put Obscura 2 through its paces until I went on vacation the past 2 weeks. After vacation, I wish I had put Obscura on my home screen sooner.

Designed for one hand use, the Control Wheel is a natural way to interact with your iPhone’s camera controls. I love the haptic feedback, making you feel each refinement towards a perfect shot. Obscura also remembers your settings between sessions. I shot a lot with the telephoto lens on vacation and liked that it was still on it when I would reopen. You have to check out the animations between the different grid modes. Superb.

Obscura also makes it easy to take RAWs. I really don’t know what I am doing when editing them after the fact, but this phone has 256 gigs of storage so heres to having the data later on just in case.

The photo library viewer is organized in reverse chronological order and displayed by a swipe down on the viewfinder. I like how I can swipe up in the viewfinder to see my albums, including the automatically generated Obscura album. Tapping on a thumbnail shows you the full sized image along with all the metadata you’d ever want. From there you can apply one of 19 beautiful filters. There are 16 more available; 15 through in app purchase and 1 through sharing the app.

Future app development and features are already under development and I can’t wait to try them out. Experience the joy of capturing photos with Obscura 2 for 4.99.

Here are some sample shots from Canada.

Whenever I watch Rachel use my iPhone X it looks like the future. Still in awe of these displays and this device.

For how often my AirPods fall out while walking (aka never) I get abnormally nervous walking over street grates with them in.

Sometimes I forget that I have cross posting from my blog turned on. Too bad Twitter won’t let me fix typos. Another pro of owning your content and Micro.blog.

Musical Privilege

I was paging through the Relay.FM guests the other day and noticed my friend Dave Wiskus and clicked to see what shows he was on. I saw one of them was talking about one of his favorite albums Hot Fuss. I decided to relisten to the episode since I am more familiar with The Killers now than when the show was originally released.

Dave brings up a good point near the end of the show. He mentions that years ago music listeners had to go to the record store and spend money on a full album. These purchases said something about them and defined the kind of music they were into.

Between online music stores and now streaming, that whole model is upended. As Dave points out, you pay Apple Music or Spotify for the ability to stream nearly the world’s catalog of music.

This observation made me reflect on my own musical renaissance. When I first got an iPod, I began to fill it with all different kinds of music. In my youth I would… find a lot of things off the back of a truck. If I liked a song by a band I’d just grab the whole discography. My liberal use of μTorrent allowed me to explore music with zero cost. The result was asking my parents for a lot of CDs and and concert tickets1.

With streaming music services, me and millions of others continue to experience new music in a zero risk environment2. When people ask me what kind of music I am into, I frequently say I like anything where I can appreciate an intentionality in the composition. Some days I am rocking out to prog rock, the label I would have perpetuated in the record era. But today its equally as likely I’m listening to Top 40s, jazz, R&B, you name it.

I’m confident I never would have given this music the time of day if I grew up in a different era. The radio lacks the immediacy of streaming which I think is critical. If someone tells me to check out an album, moments later it is streaming to my ears.

I possess no single music identity and I’m grateful to live in an era of musical privilege.